Managing Traffic at Casa Hubbert’s Peak

It sure SEEMS that there is a constant flow of people knocking at the door, prompting me to interrupt whatever I am doing to go to the door. So today I thought I would do some empirical data collection. Here was the traffic between 8:30 am and 12:30pm. A total of 16 people came by. Here was today’s crop: all individually welcome, but as a stream of door knockers, something that is starting to “molestar-me” (annoy me).

1 Fruit woman (got papaya, bananas and Pitaya – a delicious fruit the color of pomegranate)

2 Fish man (got fresh corvina, a lake fish)

3 Cashew man (replenished our supply of freshly roasted cashews)

4 Rodrigo, the roof repair man (when it rains hard, we have a mini flood in the bedroom)

5 Electronics repair man (fridge)

6 Two kids – brother and sister – thanks to Stan & Bluma donation, will get their first pair of shoes today

7 Roger, the cuidador from the studio (who was organizing a horse cart for cement bags)

8 Pedro, the pool guy and dog walker extraordinaire!

9 Roselyne, our French neighbor, picking up the weekly organic vegetable delivery box

10 “The girls”, (i.e. 3 girls I got into school, coming for a treat of peanut butter sandwiches)

11 Tignum the bread baker (delivering whole wheat sourdough bread)

12 Marisol, the cleaning woman (whom we really appreciate 3x a week)

13 A man collecting money for children who are in hospital

14 Roger again from the studio

15 Ben, back from business meetings in Managua

16 Nayeli, our German friend (to start preparing dinner for tonight)

So while I look forward to installing an “eye” in the door, in order to select when I feel like opening or not, it occurs to me based on this day’s data, that in all above cases, I would have opted to open the door. So there it is – life in a small “village” where the active street life seeps through the heavy wooden door.